Tag Archives: Learning

Blogging Mentor

Not too long ago I came upon this post by Sue Waters. She was looking for folks who were involved in education who might be interested in mentoring new student bloggers. Something about her post called out to me. Sue has taken a different approach from QuadBlogging, which seeks to facilitate commenting on school or class blogs by grouping schools from around the world in fours, or quads (hence the term quadblogging).

Sue’s approach is to match individual students with individual educators. Typically between 20 and 30 students are matched to one adult who serves as a mentor to those students. The students create their own blogs and Sue provides a series of challenges for them to respond to over a period of ten weeks. The mentor is tasked with visiting each student’s blog at least three times over the course of the ten weeks, commenting on posts and returning to continue the conversations, and reminding the students of the various challenges.

Here’s what I wrote when signing up to be a mentor:

Hi,

I’ve been teaching kids and adults about and with computers for many years, and this year will be a lower school STEAM Integrator at a school in Riverdale, NY. I LOVE to swim freestyle outdoors in the summer, practice yoga, kayak and walk. And I am excited about teaching Lego robotics using the NXT language, and Scratch and WeDo sensors!

I’ve been blogging since April 2007 athttps://neurons.wordpress.com/

Would like to mentor ages 8-11 (grades 3-5 or 6).

Cheers, Laurie

The students I am mentoring are 12 year olds in 7th grade. Blogging is a new experience for many of the students, and they have constraints such as time (like most of us!) and unfamiliarity with either the process of blogging or the platform they are using, or both. I am eager to see how they develop as bloggers over these coming weeks.

Well, I have planning to do for tomorrow, so will return in a day or so to finish updating this post with links to the remaining 11 student blogs!

Wow, it’s been 5 years.

Five years of blogging. Still interested in the brain, but I’ve expanded, not uncommon when given the freedom to follow ideas wherever they lead.

Some months I am prolific, other months rather quiet. For awhile there were some wonderful folks who were regular commenters, but I let down my end of the blogger’s bargain – I stopped commenting on other people’s blogs!

My threads have included the physiology of the brain, thoughts about schooling, professional development for faculty, human anatomy, workshops on: learning-the brain-the arts-yoga, posts for SharpBrains.com, and more recently, the aging process.

In several weeks I will begin a new tack for my teaching career. For the past 30 years I have thought of myself professionally as a computer teacher and facilitator of professional development for faculty. Beginning in June, I will take on the role of lower school STEM Integrator, focusing on the “T” – technology. (STEM = Science, Technology, Engineering, Math.)

I am excited to switch mental gears to become part of a new community of learners, and to explore learning from a different perspective.

Yeehah! It’s been five years, and the next five are wide open for discovery! To anyone who has stopped by to read and ponder for a bit, thank you for visiting. I hope you’ve gone away with something to nourish your ideas or answer your questions.

(First post: April 4, 2007 – Calendar)

Barbara Arrowsmith

In January 2008 I wrote a post about Barbara Arrowsmith entitled Plasticity and Education. I first heard about Barbara through reading Norman Doidge’s book The Brain That Changes Itself. To quote my piece from 2008, Barbara was born with an asymmetrical brain, which means that one side of her brain functioned astonishingly well and the other side functioned retardedly. Her experiences growing up led to her opening a school that made use of strategies she learned through experience and research. Here she is in her own words, talking about the book she has just written, The Woman Who Changed Her Brain: And Other Inspiring Stories of Pioneering Brain Transformation.

The Tree of Yoga

I recently finished reading B.K.S. Iyengar’s The Tree of Yoga, which was given to me as a parting gift when I left my previous school. Iyengar wrote a bit about the art of teaching, and I enjoyed mulling over his ideas.

Iyengar stated, indeed, warned that you “teach only what you know. Do not teach what you do not know…” I have often heard it said that the best way to learn is to teach. Especially in my early years of teaching, walking into a room to teach something with which I was not familiar caused that butterfly feeling in the pit of my stomach, coupled with the hope that nobody would notice my lack of expertise.

In the many years since, I have learned that often times my students will have more knowledge or exposure to something than I have – not uncommon in the fast changing world of computers and technology. I learned that teaching is a two-way shared process between the “teacher” and the “student”. Those nouns are in quotes because, at any given time, the roles change between me, the teacher, and those in the class, the students. Indeed, I hugely believe in and have always tried to have students be part of the professional development sessions organized for faculty. Change up the role dynamics and the process of learning is enhanced for everyone.

So learn, do, re-learn, experience, and you will be able to teach with confidence, courage and clarity.

Teachers must always be learning. They will learn from their pupils and must have the humility to tell them that they are still learning their art.

Iyengar touched on another area of teaching, which is understanding who your students are, and realizing that we do not all learn in the same manner or at the same pace. It is important to try and differentiate instruction so that the learner can make meaning from the experience.

The art of teaching is also to know when to stop.

There are two types of teaching. One is explaining according to your intelligence. The other is knowing the weakness of your pupils, and how you have to explain in order for them to understand your meaning.

First published in 1988, Iyengar’s book deals with the teaching of yoga, but I think that just about all strong teaching follows a similar process. Yoga is, in some ways, similar to physical education and also to physical art. Phys ed and the arts are highly experiential and often touted as providing many examples of teaching that could (should?) be ported over to the academic classroom.

Notes from a 6th grade session on Stress

There are three 6th grade sections at the school where I currently teach. These sixth graders have an enlightened and passionate Science teacher who makes study of the brain their main focus throughout the year. Among the many topics explored, she guides the students to learn about how they learn – metacognition in real time! She invited me to do a session with each section about stress and relaxation. Below are my notes.

If anyone has suggestions for improving this session, please leave a comment. Thanks!

                                           

Room Setup – this was done in the Science classroom where all the furniture was movable. We moved the tables to the perimeter of the room and placed the chairs in a semi- circle (a large C shape) on the inside of that perimeter, facing the board. We tried to have equal room between the chairs to facilitate movement activities. My chair was part of the circle and near the board for easy access.

The movement portions were accompanied by music played on my laptop using external speakers.

How’s everyone feeling? Introductions

Talk about how there are butterflies in my stomach due to: not knowing any of the students and being excited to teach a topic of huge interest to me. Further note that, due to nervousness and excitement, I will likely not remember everyone’s names.

Nonetheless, to try and help me recall names, please introduce yourself and tell me something about you. (Depending upon the time – for the first two groups we had 45 mins, for the third group we had 90 mins – have the kids also make a movement with their arms or body as they introduce themselves.)

Synovial Joint Warmup to music (Wade in the Water – about 4 mins)

  • toes & ankles
  • shoulders
  • gentle neck roll – avoid dropping head back
  • wrist rolls
  • squat knee circles
  • hip circles
  • empty coat sleeve twists
  • hokey-pokey right arm, then left arm
  • hokey-pokey right leg, then left leg
  • mouth & eyes
  • whole body

What happens inside your body when everything is pretty much feeling fine?

  • HOMEOSTASIS (homeo = same; stasis = stable) – a fairly stable balance in your body between the energizing & calming chemicals inside you
  • the SYMPATHETIC (activates “fight or flight”) & PARASYMPATHETIC (activates relaxation response) nervous systems are in synch with one another

Stress, anyone? What happens in your body when you fall out of homeostasis? i.e. out of balance –> you experience STRESS

  • “fight or flight”
  • release of CORTISOL
  • confusion
  • a sense of learned helplessness
  • a sense of feeling threatened

What’s the deal with CORTISOL?

  • a little bit is helpful for energy
  • helps enhance long term memory, i.e. learning
  • LIMBIC system is the Drama Department of your brain – memory & learning are enhanced when there is an emotional component
  • however, too much emotion in either direction results in more cortisol, which is detrimental towards learning b/c too much cortisol can kill neurons in the hippocampus, which is a major player in forming memory i.e. in learning
  • insufficient sleep can increase cortisol

Long-term effects of too much cortisol include:

  • decreased immune system, i.e. more likely to get sick
  • reduces memory ability, i.e. ability to recall existing memories & form new memories
  • impacts social skills & creative skills

What can cause stress? (below is a generic list –> rather than share these, do the BALANCE ACTIVITY listed below) 

  • lots of excitement
  • deadlines (school work, being late)
  • intense competition
  • hectic environment
  • really fast music
  • strong feeling of impending failure
  • surprises
  • being held accountable
  • feeling out of control
  • trying to accomplish something but not having what you need
  • an unusual challenge
  • insufficient sleep

Positive and Negative Stress – BALANCE ACTIVITY

  • talk about the Balance Scale (like the scales of Justice – one cup on either side of the center) – discuss what the balance represents
  • hand out index cards to each person and have them write down the negative stressors in their lives and the feelings associated with those stressors
  • ask the kids to each share one item from their list, and explain that it is quite possible that some kids will have the same or similar stressors
  • have the kids come up and place their Negative Stressor index cards on one side of the scale – what happens to homeostasis?
  • leave the cards in place on the balance and hand out a second set of index cards to each person – have them write down the positive stressors in their lives and the feelings associated with those stressors
  • ask the kids to each share one item from their list
  • take the negative stressor index cards off the balance and place them to the side – have the kids come up and place their Positive Stressor index cards on the other side of the scale – what happens to homeostatis?
  • kids will often quickly comment that the negative stressors need to return to the scale in order to return to a balance – discuss what this means in terms of themselves

How to deal with stress  (below is a generic list –> rather than share these, do the SUGGESTIONS ACTIVITY listed below) 

  • exercise (but not if it’s 4 hours or less before sleep)
  • eat a light, non-spicy dinner
  • get sufficient sleep
  • drink plenty of water –> there’s more water in your brain than anywhere else in your body (followed by muscles, then kidneys) and the stress response kicks in if access to water is restricted; within 5 mins of drinking water there is a noticeable decline in corticoids
  • lack of water is #1 reason for daytime tiredness –> hits your muscles and your brain
  • and try these relaxation techniques (we did a yoga session that includes various poses, breathing techniques and guided relaxation AFTER we did the SUGGESTIONS ACTIVITY noted below)

Dealing with Stress – SUGGESTIONS ACTIVITY

  • go around the room and have kids share what they do to destress
  • keep a running list on the board
  • do not judge the ideas (for instance, if they resort to eating comfort food that is filled with sugar)

Follow-up activities

  • using the list of kid-generated destressors as the basis, discuss positive ways to deal with stress
  • go further into the LIMBIC system
  • lead into a discussion/lesson on the Teen Brain

Falling into my lap

Things fell into my lap today due to the kindness of friends.

Thanks to @MartiWeston for sharing Time.com’s interactive timeline of an encapsulated history of trying to understand the human brain. The timeline looks at the brain through the lenses of ancient beliefs, anatomy, psychology, disorders and neuroscience.

And thanks to my new colleague, a Science teacher of 6th and 9th graders, for inviting me to join her class in November to tour the Cushing Center at Yale. The center houses the brains, notes and research findings from Dr Harvey Cushing, often referred to as “the father of modern neurosurgery”. I suspect this will be a hugely interesting exhibit and wonder if our 70 minutes will whet my curiosity or if a return trip will be needed!