Sit? Stand? Move!

I have a standing desk in my office. Easily adjustable, it can be lowered to function as a sitting desk, but I only use it as a standing one because directly opposite is the counter at which I used to sit. That counter is now used as a staging area or as a place to sit for lunch.

After reading a NY Times article this past November, Stand More at Work, Sit More at Home, I decided to do an experiment. Initially, my experiment was going to run for a full week, but it quickly became apparent this would not be necessary.

I tracked my sitting and standing times on a typical weekend day, in this case Sunday, November 15 (my birthday!) I tried to avoid consciously changing behaviour in order to keep the results as true as possible, and here is what the result was: 6 hours 30 minutes spent sitting, 8 hours 5 minutes spent standing.

The next day, Monday, November 16, I tracked my sitting and standing standing desk at worktime at school. When teaching, I am typically on my feet in different classrooms. My office is on the second floor of a building, requiring me to use one long and one short set of stairs to go up and down, something that I do multiple times each day. Our school campus has four buildings, and my office, where all my supplies are located, is not in the same building as the classrooms in which I teach. The result: 6 hours 32 minutes spent sitting, 9 hours 50 minutes spent standing.

I stopped my experiment at this point, because the goal was to compare a weekend day to a work day, and all of my work days are similar in terms of standing, sitting, and walking around.

Of course, all of this made me wonder WHY is it better for humans to stand than to sit. According to James Levine of the Mayo Clinic,

The impact of movement – even leisurely movement – can be profound. For starters, you’ll burn more calories. This might lead to weight loss and increased energy. Even better, the muscle activity needed for standing and other movement seems to trigger important processes related to the breakdown of fats and sugars within the body. When you sit, these processes stall – and your health risks increase. When you’re standing or actively moving, you kick the processes back into action.

His full article is available here.

The operative word in Levine’s comments above is movement. Research has shown that it is movement, not simply standing, that makes a difference in our overall health. Thus, no matter how you slice it, sitting too long is a health hazard, as artfully depicted in this Washington Post infographic.

For reference, here are some past posts related to movement:

  • Move It!  – how exercise boosts brain power
  • Exercise Lights A Spark – the first of two posts about John Ratey’s book SPARK, provides background for the second post
  • Mostly in Ratey’s Words – explains the benefits of exercise on learning, particularly the Science of exercise’s impact on the hippocampus
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2 thoughts on “Sit? Stand? Move!

  1. synapsesensations Post author

    Thanks for your comment and for the reminder about the human body. Perfect timing! This morning’s NY Times Well column has a post by Jane Brody, Posture Affects Standing and Not Just the Physical Kind. About midway she notes:

    Any repetitive or prolonged position “trains” the body’s muscles and tendons to shorten or lengthen and places stress on bones and joints that can reshape them more or less permanently.

  2. theinternalathlete

    Great post! Also it’s important to consider that the human body moulds itself to how you use it most.

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