The Short and The Long of It

Much of what we are exposed to in any one day goes in one ear and out the other, so to speak. Thanks to our five senses, we take note of a stimulus but, unless it resonates with us or there is a compelling reason to hold on to it, we soon move on to whatever is next.

If you have ever baked bread then you know that a loaf in progress gets a lot of kneading. I envision memory as also having a kneading stage. Information that makes it past short-term memory winds up going through stages of processing, which include relating the information to other pieces of information. That’s the kneading process!

The more we knead the information, the greater the likelihood we will form connections that cause the information to become part of our long-term memory. However, there can be a slew of obstacles that interfere with the kneading process or with taking in the initial stimulus. Just think of what happens when you use bad yeast or you knead the bread insufficiently.

sm-explorations.pngThe next sequence of activities involves simulations dealing with emotional memory, attention distraction, reading, writing, and arithmetic. Faculty are asked to try the first two and then as many of the others as they like. After a summer of not being focused on learners, this will be a refresher on the diversity of learning. Click for a full size version of the Explorations screen.

Here are some organizations that focus on supporting diverse learners.
WestEd – Using Technology to Support Diverse Learners
Center for Applied Special Technology (CAST) – Universal Design for Learning
Mel Levine – All Kinds of Minds ~ Understanding Differences in Learning

This is the tenth of about twenty or fewer posts, and for further information about this series please read Closings and Openings. As you follow the development of this activity, please feel free to chime in with suggestions or questions!

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s